livelymorgue:

Jan. 4, 1933: The oceanliner L’Atlantique, en route to Cherbourg from Bordeaux for “annual overhauling,” caught fire near the Normandy coast, near its destination,  and “rumors of sabotage were current.” The fire had spread so swiftly, starting from somewhere in the first-class quarters, that its cause couldn’t be determined, and 17 of its 238 crew were presumed dead (and, later, five stowaways were found dead). A literal tug-o’-war ensued, as ships from France, Germany and the Netherlands vied to tow it back and receive compensation. A French and Dutch ship reached the beleaguered vessel first, and “the tugs started pulling in opposite directions, getting nowhere and endangering the L’Atlantique even further.” Order was restored by a nearby warship. Photo: The New York Times

329 notes

the59thstreetbridge:

Cell organelles and cytoplasm visualisation — Anatomia Vegetal 1929, pub. by FE Wachsmuth b

the59thstreetbridge:

Cell organelles and cytoplasm visualisation — Anatomia Vegetal 1929, pub. by FE Wachsmuth b

(Source: Flickr / bibliodyssey)

1,320 notes

unknowneditors:

Nicholas Jones born 1974 in UK,  is an international book sculptor based in Melbourne Australia. He completed a Bachelor of Fine Art at the Victorian College of the Arts in 1997, Master of Fine Art at RMIT University in 2001 and a Graduate Diploma of Education at The University of Melbourne in 2003.

Nicholas Jones aims at highlight- ing the poetic nature of the book as a form. From his tiny Melbourne studio, he stacks, folds, tears, cuts and sews book leaves, transforming books into works of art, small sculptures that question the way books are read. Like a surgeon examin- ing and reorganizing body tissue, armed with a scalpel, Jones readdresses the book’s tissue – paper – dissecting unwanted books, casting a new light on books as an everyday commodity.
From Where They Create. Text by Alexandra Onderwater.

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2,085 notes

oldbookillustrations:

At this very instant the young fairy came out from behind the hangings.
Harry Clarke, from The fairy tales of Charles Perrault, London, 1922.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

At this very instant the young fairy came out from behind the hangings.

Harry Clarke, from The fairy tales of Charles Perrault, London, 1922.

(Source: archive.org)

366 notes

ooksaidthelibrarian:

n246_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.
Via Flickr: Coloured figures of the birds of the British Islands. v.1 London :R. H. Porter,1885-1897.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/34514976

ooksaidthelibrarian:

n246_w1150 by BioDivLibrary on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Coloured figures of the birds of the British Islands. v.1
London :R. H. Porter,1885-1897.
biodiversitylibrary.org/page/34514976

245 notes

nbcsnl:

In theaters this Halloween, comes a new vision of horror like you’ve never seen before. From the twisted mind of Wes Anderson, it’s “The Midnight Coterie of Sinister Intruders”, starring Owen Wilson as a man in danger.

9,513 notes

odditiesoflife:

Topsy-Turvy World 

This incredible vintage/medieval-styled illustration features fantasy creatures placed in incredible inverse scenarios. The riddle contains 29 inversions. Find them all.

Art project by Sveta Dorosheva.

2,772 notes

hyperallergic:

An Incredible Archive of American Folk Music

OAKLAND, Calif. — I’m remembering a quote from television producer David Simon (The Wire) who when…

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hyperallergic:

An Incredible Archive of American Folk Music

OAKLAND, Calif. — I’m remembering a quote from television producer David Simon (The Wire) who when…

View Post

21 notes

free-parking:

Salvador Dalí — The Eye of Time, 1949, platinum, rubies, and diamonds

free-parking:

Salvador Dalí — The Eye of Time, 1949, platinum, rubies, and diamonds

56,840 notes

odditiesoflife:

Modern Bestiary

Throughout the Middle Ages, enormously popular bestiaries presented descriptions of rare and unusual animals, typically paired with a moral or religious lesson. The real and the imaginary blended seamlessly in these books—at the time, the existence of a rhinoceros was as credible as a unicorn or dragon.

Although modern audiences scoff at the impossibility of mythological beasts, there remains an extraordinary willingness by the public to suspend skepticism and believe wild stories about nature.

Domenico Gnoli (1933-1970) is one of the most neglected illustrators of the 20th century. Born in Rome, Italy, he was an Italian artist, writer and stage designer. Gnoli was an imaginative, intense and technically gifted artist. He is best known for his books Orestes (The Art of Smiling), 1961 and Bestiario Moderno (Modern Bestiary), 1968.

In Modern Bestiary, Gnoli produced an incredible collection of pen and ink illustrations that are intricately detailed and nothing short of amazing. Looking like ‘pop art’, his animal creations look like strange but lovable household pets. Who wouldn’t want a flying cat or rhino-chicken?

sources 1, 2, 3, 4

10,690 notes